ESCAPE


MULL THAT MEETS THE EYE

The perfect lockdown retreat – pandemic or not – may be closer than you think. We take a deeper look at the majestic Hebridean island of Mull

If recent events have taught us anything, the ability to find places of solace in the UK’s most far-flung corners is a juggling act between seclusion and isolation. Off the west coast of Scotland, many might find the perfect balance on the windswept coasts and rolling highlands of the Isle of Mull.

Mull is the fourth-largest island off the coast of Scotland, as well as the fourth-largest island surrounding the UK. Reached by ferry from Oban, the Isle of Mull present as 397 square-mile topography of lush, green highland; deep, sweeping valleys; towering, otherworldly rock-strewn outcrops; and various low-lying shores on its coastline, dotted with numerous sandy beaches and towering cliff-faces alike.

In the summer months especially, the encompassing 300 miles or so of coastline attracts a steady stream of sailors, adventurers, thrill-seekers and animal lovers to explore its shores, while inland, the Isle’s mountainous core – Ben More, a peak of some 966m (3,169 feet) – gives way to a variety of small, but lively, fishing towns and villages, including the main port of Craignure in the east, which connects the isle with mainland Scotland, and Mull's colourful main town of Tobermory, which is situated at the northern entrance of the Sound of Mull.

Like most Hebridean islands, the allure of their rugged landscapes is matched by the sense of seclusion they offer, and this is certainly mirrored in Mull’s miniscule population of roughly 3,000. But life on Mull is slightly different, with the natural surroundings encouraging visitors – and indeed residents – to be wholly more active in their daily pursuits.

“For most, living in Mull represents the opportunity to pursue an energetic lifestyle,” says Tom Stewart-Moore, Knight Frank’s Head of Rural Agency Scotland. “There’s sailing; sea or salmon fishing; stalking and shooting; hill walking; or the ability to watch and interact with the abundance of wildlife native to the island. Mull has it all.”

There’s sailing; sea or salmon fishing; stalking and shooting; hill walking; or the ability to watch and interact with the abundance of wildlife native to the island. Mull has it all

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Riverside Lifestyle